Hawke’s Bay Wine – Spring 2017

Hawke’s Bay Winegrowers presents your digital issue of Hawke’s Bay Wine – Spring Issue.

  • School’s out for wine educator
  • Water a mainstream political conversation
  • How to scam proof your business

In every issue, we profile Hawke’s Bay Wine companies and personalities, wine from our region and associated sectors. We offer up a number of informed viewpoints, cover the news and present a range of wine-related feature stories.

Do you have news relating to Hawke’s Bay Wine Sector?

Email: hawkesbaywinemag@xtra.co.nz
Advertising enquiries can be directed to Kite Communications

Copyright © 2017 Hawke’s Bay Winegrowers Inc, All rights reserved.

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Villa Maria and George’s cellar


Glengarry’s Sunday ramblings of all things vinous, grain and glorious. Villa Maria and George’s cellar comes from The Sunday Sediment.

Sir George Fistonich
Sir George Fistonich

A true New Zealand original, Villa Maria Wine Estates, is over 55 years old, proudly displayed the Glengarry Wineletters from the early days, front and centre. You do have to appreciate what it has taken over the years to get this world-class, family-owned winery to its prestigious position, and you can put it down to the talent, attention to detail, and sheer determination of its founder Sir George Fistonich and his team.

Nick Picone
Nick Picone

Consisting of Villa Maria itself, plus the Vidal, Esk Valley and Te Awa Collection, we tip our hats to the wonderful consistency of quality that exists across VMs entire portfolio. Nick Picone is Villa Marias Group Chief Winemaker and has been with the company for 18 years and counting. A multiple winner of Winemaker of the Year titles and listed as one of the worlds young winemakers to watch, he is an asset to the New Zealand wine industry.

VM Library release Cab Sauv & Merlot/Cab Sauv

The nowadays iconic George Fistonich (that’s ‘Sir George’ to you mere mortals) decided a while ago to start selecting wines from exceptional parcels with a thought to aging them and releasing them in very limited quantities via the cellar door and through selected retailers (that would be us). The wines are at the ultra-premium level, and having been already aged by Villa Maria themselves, they are good to go, and very favourably priced for what’s in the bottle. Villa Maria, then, at its finest. Read more in the Glengarry Wineletter – #232 August 2017.

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A tour of Italy – Part 1


Glengarry’s Sunday ramblings of all things vinous, grain and glorious. A tour of Italy – Part 1 comes from The Sunday Sediment Issue 5.

Veneto

Veneto is home to the glorious sinking city of Venice and the romantic jewel that is Verona. Here, you’ll find great value Soave, Valpolicella and Bardolino wines. Less than half of the wine produced in Veneto is able to be labelled with the Italian quality mark of DOC, with large quantities of IGT (table wine) produced there, making it an important region for quantity. It is also home to the superstar Amarone, and to the sparkling Prosecco wines made in Conegliano-Valdobbiadene. Read more in the Glengarry Wineletter – #232 August 2017.

Piemonte

Bruno Giacosca

Piemonte produces some of Italy’s most long-lived wines. A treasure trove of culinary delights, it is home to Barolo, Barbaresco, truffles and hazelnuts. The predominant red grapes are the indigenous Nebbiolo, Barbera and Dolcetto, the whites, Arneis and Moscato. The wines are distinctly regional and oozing with flair. Lovers of Pinot Noir will feel right at home with Nebbiolo, which is bottled in its own right as well as being the variety behind the famed Barolo wines. Read more in the Glengarry Wineletter – #232 August 2017.

Toscana

Cesare & Andrea Cecchi with La Signora Cecchi

A long with Piemonte, Toscana (Tuscany) has the highest percentage of top-tier DOCG wines, and is home to the scarlet giants Chianti, Brunello di Montalcino and Vino Nobile di Montepulciano. It is here that the new meets the old head-on, giving rise to the so-called Super Tuscans. The main variety in Tuscany is Sangiovese, used to make Chianti, with the variety’s greatest expression derived from the legendary Brunello clone developed by Montalcino’s Biondi-Santi family.

Read more in the Glengarry Wineletter – #232 August 2017.

 

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Sussex Winery receives prestigious title at the inaugural UK Wine Awards

(English Wine Producers – 26 July 2017)

The Bolney Wine Estate was delighted to receive the prestigious ‘Winery of the Year’ award at the inaugural UK Wine Awards. Spearheaded by English Wine Producers’ Julia Trustram Eve and members of the EWP and the UK Vineyards Association, the UK Wine Awards is the national competition for wine produced from grapes grown in England and Wales, inspired by the growing popularity of English and Welsh wines.

The respected title for the Sussex-based winery, which is run by Sam Linter, is testament to the hard work Sam and her team have put into The Bolney Wine Estate. The ethos at the winery is to produce the best wines possible and ensure quality is at the heart of everything – something which has clearly paid off. The high standards Sam has set – from maintaining the highest level of viticulture and vinification to the training the staff receive – has seen the winery go from strength to strength.

Sam Linter, Winemaker and MD of Bolney Wine Estate comments: “We are over the moon to have won ‘Winery of the Year’ at the UK Wine Awards – we still can’t quite believe it! It’s such a prestigious accolade and an endorsement of the hard work each and every one of us at Bolney puts into our wines. We’re delighted that UK wine is finally getting the attention it deserves – and we’re incredibly excited for what the future holds for the industry.”

Bolney also won ‘Top Still Wine’ and ‘Most Outstanding Single Varietal Wine’ for its Foxhole Vineyard Pinot Gris 2016 with judges remarking it is “a delightful example of Pinot Gris; pure, expressive and fragrant with notes of honeysuckle and spiced pear.” A dry white wine with fragrant aromas of rose, jasmine and conference pear, the palate is wonderfully rich and creamy with a slightly honeyed character – a perfect summer’s wine.

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Wine exports to the USA surpass $500 million

Wednesday, 3 May 2017, 2:34 pm | Press Release: New Zealand Winegrowers

Leaves & vines from Kirkpatrick Estate Winery
Leaves & vines from Kirkpatrick Estate Winery

Wine exports to the USA surpass $500 million for the first time

The latest data from Statistics New Zealand show wine exports to the USA have surpassed $500 million for the first time, up 11% in the last year.

As the wine industry advances towards its goal of $2 billion of exports in 2020, there is significant potential for further growth in North America said Philip Gregan, CEO of New Zealand Winegrowers.

“New Zealand wine, especially Sauvignon Blanc, is very popular in the US and we expect consumer demand to continue to grow.”

“The new record level of wine exports into the world’s largest and most competitive market is an outstanding achievement for New Zealand wine exporters and testifies to the strong global demand for our wines.”

New Zealand wine exports reached a new record of $1.63 billion in March year end 2017. Wine is now New Zealand’s fifth largest export good by value.

The announcement of the new export records come at a busy time for the wine sector with the 2017 vintage nearing completion and the advent of International Sauvignon Blanc Day celebrations on Friday 5 May.

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Hawke’s Bay Wine – Winter 2017

Hawke’s Bay Winegrowers presents your digital issue of Hawke’s Bay Wine – Winter Issue.

  • Building brand stories in the cellar door
  • New hydrological model making waves
  • New partner in biosecurity

In every issue we profile Hawke’s Bay Wine companies and personalities, wine from our region and associated sectors. We offer up a number of informed viewpoints, cover the news and present a range of wine-related feature stories.

Do you have news relating to Hawke’s Bay Wine Sector?

Email: hawkesbaywinemag@xtra.co.nz
Advertising enquiries can be directed to Kite Communications
Digital subscription sign up directed to Elisha

Copyright © 2017 Hawke’s Bay Winegrowers Inc, All rights reserved.

Mailing address is:
Hawke’s Bay Winegrowers Inc
PO Box 1174
Hastings, Hawke’s Bay 4156
New Zealand

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MAJOR STOKE – International Trophy win for our Quarter Acre Syrah

Breaking news from Rod McDonald Wines

In breaking news (well, breaking for you, we’ve had it on hold for a couple of weeks now…), we can tell you that our little old Quarter Acre 2015 Syrah has just taken out the trophy for the Best International Syrah in London at the International Wine Challenge (IWC). Not only that, but it also went and won the trophies for best New Zealand Syrah, Best New Zealand Red and Best Hawke’s Bay Syrah. A magnificent four-trophy-haul, with the Best NZ Red and Best International being a particularly big deal by my way of thinking.

The IWC is as prestigious as it gets, it’s a truly international competition that’s meticulously judged blind by some of the best in the business. Apparently the Quarter Acre was up against 1200 plus other gold medal winning wines across the four categories, and it took out all four trophies. Hard to fathom.

This is the biggest award I’ve ever won and it’s a really big deal for us. But it’s also a big win for New Zealand on a vast international stage, so we’re all pretty stoked, proud, amazed and grateful. One person doesn’t make the wine alone, we all know that, and although it’s my name on the bottle we’ve a small bunch of committed wine people here at RMW who all work their butts off, taking risks, crafting, wrangling, organising and grafting away all towards the same goal of making the best bloody wine we can. As risky as it may seem at the time, these awards are a real-life confirmation that we’re doing something right and this is what people want to see more of…wines that have quality at their core, but have enough personality to shine in a room full of top notch wines.

Thanks to those of you who return to buy our wine time and time (and time!) again. You grease the machine and allow us to continue. Hand on heart, thank you.

That’s all for now. I’m in China at the moment on a New Zealand Wine and Hawke’s Bay Wine trade tour, heading home in a week, but for now I may just have to go and have a couple of impressively large beers to celebrate!

Cheers, Rod

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Size does matter!!

All you wanted to know about bottle sizes, but were afraid to ask.

Split
187 ml

Half-Bottle
Holds 375 ml or one half of the standard bottle size.

Bottle
Holds 750 ml – the standard size.

Magnum
Two bottles or 1.5 litres.

Double Magnum
Twice the size of a magnum, holding 3.0 litres, or the equivalent of 4 bottles.

Jeroboam
There are two sizes of Jeroboams: the sparkling wine Jeroboam holds 4 bottles, or 3.0 litres: the still wine Jeroboam holds 6 regular bottles, or 4.5 litres.

Rehoboam
Champagne only – 4.5 litres or 6 bottles.

Imperial
Holds 6 litres or the equivalent of 8 bottles. Tends to be Bordeaux shaped.

Methuselah
Same size as an Imperial (6 litres) but is usually used for sparkling wines and is Burgundy-shaped.

Salmanazar
Holds 12 regular bottles (one case), or 9.0 litres.

Balthazar
Holds 16 bottles or 12.0 litres.

Nebuchadnezzar
Holds 20 bottles of wine or 15.0 litres. According to my colleague John Ager, quoting from Fogwells Wine Guide, it is equivalent to 20 standard bottles (15 litres, 3.96 US gal., 3.3 UK gal.). Bill Tighe says that the Nebuchadnezzar, according to the “Random House unabridged Dictionary of the English language, as she is spoken here in the colonies, is 20 quarts, or 18.9 litres”. I suspect something amiss here! The Concise Oxford doesn’t mention the word. The Encarta World English Dictionary refers only to the Babylonian king.

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Winemakers happy overall with Bay’s mixed grape harvest

By Roger Moroney | 

Rain is expected to mark a drop in overall volumes of grapes harvested this vintage.

The drought conditions of December through to mid-February had effectively “saved our bacon” in terms of how the grapes across Hawke’s Bay had weathered persistent and potentially damaging bouts of rain over the past six weeks.

However, there was likely to be a drop in overall volumes along with a drop in sugar levels and in individual cases a possible rise in the cost of harvesting, leading winemaker Rod McDonald said.

Bright, warm and dry days had seen the critical early development of grapes go extremely well, Mr McDonald said, adding that effectively created a good base for fruit protection when the rains did arrive.

“There was good early flavour development during the start of the season – they [grapes] may be down on sugars but the flavours are there.”

Location had been a factor in which vineyards saw reduced volumes, he said, although the overall drop was unlikely to be major.

Of the three vineyards which sourced Rod McDonald Wines one would be down on volumes as a result of the rain belts but the other two were actually slightly ahead of their initial estimates.

“It depends where you were to find the effects where rain hit.”

He said coastal areas like Te Awanga came through well.

“We’ve got some amazing chardonnay and perfect ripeness out of there.”

Rain often created extra costs due to stopping and starting of harvesting – “darting back and forth” – as well as the need for selected picking plans.

“But you’ve just got to suck it up.”

Mr McDonald said he was at a wine tasting in Auckland about a month ago and was asked what effect rain would have on the grape harvest and how damaging could it be.

He replied that despite Hawke’s Bay’s dry reputation everyone in the industry had a wet weather plan and were always prepared for such an eventuality.

“If you don’t then you’re dreaming.”

Part of his plan was to go with “discretion rather than valour” and carry out an earlier than usual harvest of some Syrah and Merlot so as not to put them through any more rain.

“You have to ask yourself ‘do I pull the pin now and bank it or push on through?”

But he still has some Syrah out, along with Cabernet “and they are in great shape”.

Having a damp end to the season was always a threat and simply “one of those things you have to deal with”.

Mission Estate winemaker Paul Mooney took the same stance.

“We have had a remarkable amount of rainfall over the past six or seven weeks and that is not ideal for grape growing but we have worked around it.”

Mr Mooney said there had been some grape loss.

“There have been one or two blocks we’ve had to leave.”

While volumes would be down it would not be major and he agreed with Mr MacDonald that the hot, dry start for the season had put things on the right path.

“It just hasn’t been ideal in the way it has finished,” he said.

He also agreed that while sugar levels were down flavours would still be very good.

Hawkes Bay Today

 

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Top 12 2014 vintage wines selected to represent Hawke’s Bay on the world stage

17 March 2017

 

On 13 March 2017, Bob Campbell MW spent the afternoon in Hawke’s Bay, blind tasting his way through a sea of 2014 vintage Hawke’s Bay Chardonnay, Syrah and Merlot Cabernet blends concealed in brown paper bags.  Mr Campbell then selected the top 12 2014 vintage wines to represent Hawke’s Bay, only finding out himself on Wednesday which wines he had selected.

Bob Campbell was the second New Zealander, and is one of just over 300 people in the world to hold the Master of Wine qualification. Mr Campbell is an internationally acclaimed wine judge and is widely regarded as the New Zealand’s foremost wine educator.

Melisa Beight, Executive Officer of Hawke’s Bay Winegrowers Association Inc. said that the boards and members were thrilled that Bob Campbell MW had agreed to judge the 2014 Hawke’s Bay Vintage Collection.  “This is the first year we have produced a Hawke’s Bay Vintage Collection and it marks a real milestone for the region.  The Hawke’s Bay Vintage Collection will be judged by Bob Campbell every year from now on, with the top 12 wines representing the best of Hawke’s Bay being sent out to global key opinion leaders, so that they can make their own assessment.”

“The overall standard was very high indeed” declared Bob Campbell MW.  “Clearly 2014 was a truly top vintage. A range of different Chardonnay styles added extra interest, and a degree of difficulty in choosing the ultimate winners. Syrah was stylistically more consistent as well as being the highest performer of the three classes. Blended reds were a pleasure to judge – all of the entries merited selection.”

The 2014 Hawke’s Bay Vintage Collection (in no particular order):

  • Vidal Legacy Chardonnay 2014
  • Te Awa Single Estate Chardonnay 2014
  • Bilancia Chardonnay 2014
  • Church Road Grand Reserve Chardonnay 2014
  • Villa Maria Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon Merlot 2014
  • Te Awa Single Estate Merlot Cabernet 2014
  • Craggy Range Te Kahu, Gimblett Gravels Vineyard, Hawke’s Bay 2014
  • Church Road McDonald Series Merlot 2014
  • Vidal Legacy Syrah 2014
  • Church Road Grand Reserve Syrah 2014
  • Sacred Hill Deerstalkers Syrah 2014
  • Craggy Range Syrah, Gimblett Gravels Vineyard, Hawke’s Bay 2014

For further information, please contact Melisa Beight, Executive Officer on 06 876 3418 or email melisa@hawkesbaywine.co.nz

About Hawke’s Bay Wine:
Founded in 2006, Hawke’s Bay Winegrowers Association Inc. represents all wineries and growers in the region and its mission is to achieve international recognition as one of the great wine regions of the world.

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Blue Wine Is Now a Thing You Can Drink

(From the they must be joking file – Ed)

Blue Wine Is Now a Thing You Can DrinkRosé wine? So passé. Red and white? Please, those are centuries old. But now, some good news for those seeking the next big thing in beverages: a Spanish winemaker is crafting an electric blue wine.

“Try to forget all you know about wine,” the website for the brand, Gik, reads. “Ignore all the preconceptions and standards regarding [the] wine industry and turn a deaf ear to what the sommelier told you in the wine tasting last week.”

The vino is created from an undisclosed combination of red and white grapes that has “no aging procedure.”

If you want to get technical, Eater reports that the “juice is hued neon blue with anthocyanin (a pigment found in grape skin) and indigo (a dye extracted from the Isatis tinctoria plant), and a non-caloric sweetener is added as well.” A bottle sells for about $11, and is currently available in Spain, France, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and Germany, with U.S. expansion in the works.

So why blue? Eater asked co-founder Aritz Lopez, who made a case for his new product, even though he’s never had any winemaking experience. Apparently, Lopez and team were inspired by the concept of “red oceans,” which represent “business markets saturated by specialists (sharks) who fight for the same variables and for a reduced number of clients (fish), and end up in water turned red.

And how it’s necessary to revert this, by innovating and creating new variables, back to blue. This seemed poetic for us to turn a traditionally red beverage into a blue one,” López states. Form, meet poetic function. The only remaining question: will this turn our teeth blue, too? Either way: salud!

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Hawke’s Bay Wine – Autumn Issue

Hawke’s Bay Winegrowers presents your digital issue of Hawke’s Bay Wine – Autumn Issue.

  • Ngaruroro low flow threat to our wine industry
  • Classic Reds resounding success for Hawke’s Bay

In every issue we profile Hawke’s Bay Wine companies and personalities, wine from our region and associated sectors. We offer up a number of informed viewpoints, cover the news and present a range of wine-related feature stories.

Do you have news relating to Hawke’s Bay Wine Sector?

Email: hawkesbaywinemag@xtra.co.nz
Advertising enquiries can be directed to Kite Communications
Digital subscription sign up directed to Elisha

Copyright © 2017 Hawke’s Bay Winegrowers Inc, All rights reserved.

Mailing address is:
Hawke’s Bay Winegrowers Inc
PO Box 1174
Hastings, Hawke’s Bay 4156
New Zealand

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