The 8 Worst Mistakes Wine Drinkers Make – Vivino

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Click on image to read – The 8 Worst Mistakes Wine Drinkers Make @ Vivino

Here’s an example

1. Filling your wine glass up to the brim

Wine isn’t beer. Just because some wine glasses can fit an entire bottle of wine in them, doesn’t mean you’ll want to fill your entire glass. It makes for a heavy glass, looks silly and makes the wine difficult to drink and enjoy.

Rather, you’ll want to stick to about a 5-ounce pour. This will allow you to swirl and sniff your wine and drink and enjoy your wine with ease.

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Wine science – LCBO Discover video series

The LCBO or Liquor Control Board of Ontario have produced an enthralling series simply called ‘Discover‘.

Discover showcases the world of wines, spirits and beers in an award-winning series hosted by Michael Fagan, Manager of the Knowledge Resources Group. Join Michael as he takes you behind the label, and meets the talented masters from Ontario and around the world who craft these fine beverages. Spend some time with Michael, and increase your knowledge, expertise and enjoyment on this journey of discovery.

LCBO DISCOVER: VIDEO PODCAST SERIES

Learn

Why not checkout LCBO’s learning centre where you’ll find video, podcasts, and tips on wine, whiskey, cocktails, beer and food.

 

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From the editor: April 2014

AGM

A reminder that next month’s meeting includes the AGM. I will send out formal notifications as required by our rules closer to the event. With the Wooing Tree tasting as well we are hoping for a top evening.

In The News

As a change of pace this month we will take a backwards glance at some wine history. As a life and foundation member of the Cellar Club, Ron Thomson has written a number of papers on the early wine years in New Zealand. We will include them from time to time as a break from current news items.

World Wide Web of Wine

In the technical world in which we live, there are many items on the internet with videos and information about wines and wine appreciation. With this in mind we have decided to provide you with links to items you may find of interest.

Of course we will welcome contributions from members if you find interesting links. We will develop this through our website as well. View the ‘Out of the Bottle’ series:

Cheers
Robin Semmens, Editor

Video: Out of the bottle 3 – Wine psychology

In the third episode of our wine science series, “Out of the Bottle,” Dr. Brian Wansink, Director of Cornell University’s Food and Brand Lab, explains how expectations, environment, and social cues can fool us into believing that our wine tastes better or worse than it is.

Produced by Luke Groskin | Wine and location provided by Corkbuzz | Music by Audio Network | Additional photos and footage provided by Shutterstock, Proxy Design, Derek Skey.
Science Friday® is produced by the Science Friday Initiative, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Video: Out of the bottle 2 – Tricks of the trade

In the second episode of our wine science series, Out of the Bottle, Dr. Gavin Sacks of Cornell University’s Viticulture and Enology Program translates popular wine jargon such as “breathing,” “corked,” and “wine tears” into chemistry you can understand. He’ll also give you some tricks you can use to experience the versatility of wine.

Produced by Luke Groskin | Wine and location provided by Corkbuzz | Music by Audio Network | Additional photos and footage provided by Shutterstock by Shutterstock, Juan Carlos, Institute Andaluz del Patrimon Historico, Actors – Christopher Intagliata, Leese Katsnelson | Wine Wrangler – Sam Flatow.
Science Friday® is produced by the Science Friday Initiative, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Video: Out of the bottle 1 – Wine flavour

This is the first video in a series about wine science.

From smoky to citrusy to peppery, the unique flavour profiles of wines are scrutinized and celebrated perhaps more than any other beverage’s. In the first episode of our wine science series, Dr. Gavin Sacks of Cornell University’s Viticulture and Enology Program details the chemical composition of wine and explains why you detect the faintest aromas of oak, flowers, or green pepper in your glass.

Produced by Luke Groskin | Wine and location provided by Corkbuzz | Music by Audio Network | Additional photos and footage provided by Finger Lakes Wine Program/James Monahan, Shutterstock, Patricia Lynch, Tom Mack, Christina Sookdhis, Bodegas Delea a Marca, and Gironde Tourism

Science Friday® is produced by the Science Friday Initiative, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Northern California Wine & Food Tour 2014

Travel across North California experiencing the wine and food of San Francisco, Sonoma and Napa Valley.

2 weeks, Sat 30 Aug – Mon 8 Sep
North California (San Francisco, Sonoma and Napa Valley)
Presenter: Randy Weaver
$11,450.00 incl GST
Land package only $9,350.00 incl GST

The University of Auckland’s Centre for Continuing Education and Department of Wine Science invite you to join us for our study tour to North California in August 2014.

Saturday 30 August – Monday 8 September 2014

Travel across North California experiencing the wine and food of San Francisco, Sonoma and Napa Valley.

California accounts for nearly 90 percent of the entire American wine production. Today there are more than 1,200 wineries in the state, ranging from small boutique wineries to large corporations.

Find out why North California wine is so highly regarded for its wine and gourmet cuisine on this unique tour led by The University of Auckland’s Director of Wine Science.

As well as visiting the vineyards and wineries you will have a chance to explore famous tourist attractions such as the Golden Gate Bridge and Alcatraz, dine with local wine makers and enjoy delicious cuisine at many exquisite restaurants.

This tour is designed for wine and food lovers who would like to know more about how wine is made and the history of wine making in North California, understand the different varieties of wine and learn how to match fine wine with beautiful food.

Limited to 9 participants.

Tour highlights include:

  • Guided tour from San Francisco through the ‘Wine Country’ Napa Valley and Sonoma
  • Personalised and private vineyard tours and wine tasting among picturesque landscapes
  • Lectures and insights throughout the tour by the University’s leading lecturer in Wine Science to enrich your understanding and tour experience, including:
    • discussions of a systematic, scientific approach to wine tasting
    • the unique Californian wine grapes and the type of wine they can produce
    • an exploration of the role Italian immigrants played in creating the current wine industry
    • events that nearly destroyed the Californian wine industry and the great technological advances that have been made since
  • Dine with well known winemakers and hear more about their adventures and successes.

See more information at North California Wine & Food Tour 2014.

 

Red Wine Ageability

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2015-06-17-5580e2621d744“How long do I age red wine?” is a frequently asked question. The general assumption that all red wine can age similarly is wrong, so Winery Sage is here to get you the right information:

In our (winery-sage.com) ageability infographic, the bottle length provides a guide for judging a wine’s age worthiness. The longer the bottle, the longer the wine can age. The numbers on the label indicate the best age to enjoy the wine (Optimal). Anything before then (Immature) and the wine can often appear a little harsh. Anything after (Tired) and the wine is past its prime and will appear at best characterless or at worse, vinegar like.

Check out winery-sage.com’s interesting posts: